Vimla Jivan Jhule Lal Mandir, Pune

Pune is home to a significant population of Sindhi Hindus as well as the well-known Sadhu Vaswani Mission.  The community has also constructed temples there, including the Vimla-Jivan Jhule Lal Mandir.  With its multiple halls for religious and marriage ceremonies, the temple serves a variety of religious and cultural interests among Sindhi Hindus and hosts festivities for Cheti Chand, among other occasions. In addition to multiple images of Jhule Lal, the main hall has a series of inset shrines that include murtis of Shiva, Durga, Ganesh, Radha-Krishna, Shirdi Sai Baba, and the Buddha.

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Hindus in Pakistan

Within the discussion of minorities in Pakistan, a citizen of Karachi, Sindh, has uploaded a series of videos that include a number of Hindu temples in Sindh, as well as video of Hindu festivals and visits of gurus in Sindh and other regions of Pakistan.  These videos are included in the youtube channel Namaste Pakistan.  The temples include Lord Bhodesar Mandir, Sardro Mandir, and Ramapir Mandir (all in Nagarparkar), Bhagnari Shiv Mandir in Karachi, and Lord Krishan Mandir in Thar.

Sindhi Temple in Sri Lanka

The website for the Sindhi community in Sri Lanka includes a virtual tour of their temple, which makes up one portion of their community center in Colombo.  They have installed the Guru Granth Sahib, Shiva, and Jhule Lal among other elements in separate shrines in the temple, and they also refer to the area honoring Satya Sai Baba as a separate Sai Baba temple.  Having never been to Sri Lanka, I rely on their presentation of it at their website.

Mandirs in Pakistan

While most Sindhi Hindus migrated from Sindh after Partition, some Hindus remain there.  While their struggles in Sindh, as a small minority in Pakistan, have been significant, the information on another blog highlights the reclamation of a Hindu temple in Karachi, dedicated to Varun Dev, that non-Hindus had occupied in the aftermath of Partition.  This blog (Hindu temples in Pakistan) lists, with photos, Hindu temples across Pakistan.  The list contains a variety of temples in Sindh, including Sadh Bela near Sukkur.  Anyone with more information on these sites, please post additional materials.

Uderolal, Sindh

Exterior of joint Hindu-Muslim shrine in Uderolal, Sindh

Exterior of joint Hindu-Muslim shrine in Uderolal, Sindh

The shrine at Uderolal, Sindh, honors Jhule Lal.  Sindhi Hindus typically refer to him as an appearance of either Vishnu or Varuna who saved Hindus from a tyrannical ruler who threatened to force them to become Muslims.  Sindhi Muslims associate this shrine and the figure known as Jhule Lal with a Sufi master.  Continue reading

Manila, Philippines

Sindhi Hindus in Manila created a gurdwara/mandir, installing both the Guru Granth Sahib and various murtis.  They paid a granthi to take care of the ritual respect for the Guru Granth Sahib, as that was the primary focus in the Sindhi institution.  Later, they arranged for a brahmin to serve the murtis as well.  However, over time tensions arose as the granthi became offended when non-Sindhis visited the institution without covering their heads out of respect for the Guru Granth Sahib.  Continue reading

Sufidar, Chennai, India

Perhaps the most unique of the various institutions that I have discussed to date, Sufidar in Chennai India has generally a triple focus for the devotion of the Sindhi Hindus who visit the center. In the center of the main hall, devotees focus on a murti of Shahenshah Baba Nebhraj, who lived in Sindh and was a devotee of Kali and also recited Persian poetry devotionally.  The second focus was the current living guru, Ratanchand, who established the center in Chennai and makes regular appearances and holds audience with followers for a limited time each day or so. During my visits there, the community prepared for a major celebration focusing on Shahenshah, with a special shrine created on the opposite end of the satsang hall from his murti and guests arriving from various parts of the world to celebrate the occasion. Continue reading